United-States-Supreme-CourtThe U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on Mach Mining v. EEOC, No. 13-1019. We have blogged extensively about this case previously –  here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here. To recap, this case was initially brought by the EEOC, in which it claimed that Mach Mining had a pattern or practice of not hiring women for mining-related positions, or, in the alternative, maintaining a neutral hiring policy that has a disparate impact on women. The company asserted a number of affirmative defenses, including that the EEOC failed to conciliate in good faith before initiating litigation. The EEOC argued that its conciliation activities not subject to judicial review.

The Supreme Court deliberated on whether the EEOC satisfied its statutory obligation to attempt conciliation before filing suit, and whether its conciliation efforts are judicially reviewable by courts. On April 29, 2015, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision and concluded – in an unanimous opinion authored by Justice Kagan – that federal courts have the authority to review the EEOC’s conciliation efforts.

Our blog editor, Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. (tweet him @g_maatman) discusses the SCOTUS decision and his take on what to expect from the EEOC and implications for employers going forward with Colin O’Keefe from LXBN TV (@LXBN) and Rick Bell from Workforce (@Workforcenews) in the videos below.

5 Minutes of Management: Assessing Mach Mining v. EEOC With Rick Bell At Workforce

LXBN TV: Supreme Court Benchslaps EEOC with Mach Mining Decision With Colin O’Keefe At LXBN TV

For more information on Mach Mining v. EEOC, our readers should check out the following posts:

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Readers can also find this post on our Workplace Class Action blog here.